HPV - GENITAL WARTS

 
Cross Street Medical Clinic offers all relevant STD/STI screening tests and treatments. Speak to our doctors today about what you may need. Female doctors are available by appointment. We ensure patient privacy and confidentiality for all discussions, tests and treatments.

 
 
 
HPV Genital Warts
 
 

What are Genital Warts?

Genital warts (condylomata acuminata) are a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by certain types of human papillomavirus. HPV variants, HPV-6 and HPV-11, are responsible for 90% of genital warts.

HPV infection is also associated with 60-90% of all cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, mouth, or throat.

There are vaccinations against genital warts and HPV infection, which are available in Singapore.

Cross Street Medical offers HPV vaccinations. Speak to our doctors about what you may need


 
 

How do we contract Genital Warts?

More than 40 types of HPV are spread sexually by skin-to-skin contact with surrounding area, most commonly through vaginal and anal sex. Avoid sex until warts are removed.

In individuals with a history of previous HPV infection, the appearance of new warts may be either from a new exposure to HPV (e.g., unprotected sex with someone with genital warts), or from a recurrence of the previous infection.

Risk factors for HPV infections include:

  • Early age of first sexual exposure
  • Multiple partners
  • Smoking
  • Poor immune function

How do we prevent Genital Warts?

There is no cure for HPV, but HPV variants responsible for most genital warts may be prevented with vaccination. A vaccine must be given before exposure to the virus type to be effective, ideally before the beginning of sexual activity.

There are vaccinations against HPV associated with genital warts available in Singapore. These include:

  • Gardasil
  • Gardasil 9

Cross Street Medical offers HPV vaccinations. Speak to our doctors about which is the most suitable one for you.

How can we tell that we may have Genital Warts?

An infected person may have a cluster of warts, or just one wart. Genital warts may appear as:

  • Bumps or swellings that protrude from the surface of the skin that are usually 1-10 mm in size but may grow to several centimeters
  • Soft, raised masses with a surface that can be smooth (e.g. penile shaft)
  • Many rough fingerlike projections (e.g. anal warts)
  • Pearly, cauliflower-like swellings with slightly dark surfaces

In males, genital warts may grow on the:

  • penis
  • scrotum
  • groin
  • thighs
  • Inside or around the anus

Females may have genital warts:

  • Inside and outside the vagina
  • Inside or around the anus
  • On the cervix

In both men and women, genital warts may also appear on the lips, mouth, tongue, or throat.

Even if the genital wart cannot be seen, it may still cause symptoms, such as vaginal discharge, itching, bleeding and burning sensation.

Testing for Genital Warts

Women are recommended to have regular Pap smears to detect HPV infection and cervical cancer. HPV tests are also recommended.

There are no commonly used screening tests for genital warts. Diagnosis is made through consultation with a doctor.

Our doctors at Cross Street Medical can make the diagnosis. We ensure patient privacy and confidentiality for all discussions, tests and treatments.

What is the treatment for Genital Warts?

Warts are highly transmissible through vaginal and anal sex. Existing treatments are focused on the removal of visible warts. However, removing visible warts may not reduce the transmission of the underlying HPV infection. Recurrence remains a problem.

Therefore, it is strongly recommended that visible warts are removed by liquid nitrogen or laser treatment.
Topical preparations (e.g. Aldara) are sometimes useful but rarely able to remove warts.

Cross Street Medical
treats genital warts. Speak to our doctors today about what you may need. Female doctors are available by appointment. We ensure patient privacy and confidentiality for all discussions, tests and treatments.

How do we prevent infection and re-infection?

  • Avoiding high risk sex, including commercial sex workers, casual sex and multiple sex partners
  • Using condoms, including during oral sex
  • Being in a long-term monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative for genital warts and other STDs/STIs